Further

emma

Saturday began with a productive stint of writing, first time since Ithaca. Having started work at 7 a.m., I felt at liberty to go for a run at 10, first time in ages since the temps and humidity at home had circled 85. The 2.8 miles in 60-degree temps and low humidity went smoothly despite hills. Plus I walked about 3/4 mile more. Considered that good under the circumstances.

Further work and then I ventured out. Took a quick walk around town and found a delightful library, great displays and a children’s department that looked welcoming for adults, though I did not enter. Then on to lunch, recommended by various on-line services. The place seemed to be a dive, but there were two women sitting at the bar so I entered. Everyone nodded and then returned to intense observation of the Red Sox game. They seemed to be ignoring everything else, including their beers.

When my lunch arrived, I felt I had found a gem buried among a pile of rocks. The haddock was just-out-of -the-water fresh and simply prepared with lemon, butter, and a light crust of bread (maybe cracker?) crumbs. Sides were a huge portion of white and wild rice and the best spinach. The chef had wilted the baby leaves in garlic and olive oil. I’m going to try to duplicate it but don’t hold out much hope. Learned afterward that the place had a new chef and was the only place in the area that served decent fish.

GPS sent me down a side road, but after some backing and filling, I reserved a Times at Rite Aid. Then on to my friend’s. The two of us plus two members of her book club had a delightful conversation. Any club that has endured twenty-five years deserves national recognition. They are reading Emma at the moment. Wish I could join the conversation.

Made my way back to the B&B. As I was puttering around, there was this little whine, and I saw a nose, paws, and floppy ears trying to poke under the door. Later met the rest of the utterly charming pooch and her owner. I was so impressed at the breadth and depth of the ties among the residents of this small town.

3 thoughts on “Further”

  1. Dear Liz,

    You speak so beautifully about your time here, and about the town and the people I love. You gave as much as you got (and more), and I’m so glad you found the quiet and solitude for good writing hours. Believe me, you are more than welcome back. Margaret’s is always there for you, any time of year, just as she said, as am I.

    Much love,

    Betsy

    PS I am immersed in Petryania. Your book about your mother is teaching me so much about writing, about being black, and about complex lives lived with dignity and struggle. I’m looking forward to the letters, and to reading her novels, the last one especially. When I emerge from this world I will email you some of my thoughts.

    1. Dear Betsy, The Bluehost server just unleashed comments. I had no idea until today that I could actually view and respond to posts. Thank you, bless you for your inspiring and inspired words. “Croswell Bowen” has arrived and I will dive in this weekend. Thank yu for your gracious and loving presence. Much more to follow.

  2. Dear Liz,

    You speak so beautifully about your time here, and about the town and the people I love. You gave as much as you got (and more), and I’m so glad you found the quiet and solitude for good writing hours. Believe me, you are more than welcome back. Margaret’s is always there for you, any time of year, just as she said, as am I.
    Much love,
    Betsy
    PS I am immersed in Petryania. Your book about your mother is teaching me so much about writing, about being black, and about complex lives lived with dignity and struggle. I’m looking forward to the letters, and to reading her novels, the last one especially. When I emerge from this world I will email you some of my thoughts.

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